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Monday, July 21, 2008

Denuncia

Just as a helpful tip.

To avoid trouble for yourself.

When you put up your really nice Spanish postbox, don't add your name and address to it.

All you are doing is giving someone ammunition to denuncio you for anything because you are providing your name and address.

This is not a good idea. All someone needs to denuncio you is your name and address.

Whoever delivers your post shouldn't need to see your name and address on the post-box anyway. They should know who you are and where you live.

Would you put your name and address on a post-box in the UK?

No. Because you just have a letter-box in the door and a house name/number.

Take care if you buy a house in Spain. I am writing this because someone British we know, who lives in Spain, has received a denuncia and doesn't even know why.

He needs to appear in a Spanish police station and answer the charge that he doesn't understand.

It also happens to our Spanish neighbours. Our neighbour out the back received a denuncia for her goats and chickens. Apparently she didn't have finca papers.

Our Spanish neighbours don't publish their names and some of them still get victimised. Keep your name to yourself.

Edited to add that a denuncia is a formal complaint to the local police which has to be investigated. I suppose the nearest English equivalent word is to denounce someone, but it doesn't really carry the same weight in English so everyone just tends to use the Spanish words.

5 comments:

Peanut said...

Okay what is a denuncio? It is not good obviously.

Anonymous said...

oh I was not sure either, what exactly is a denuncio, I looked it up on Google but nothing came up to tell me what it meant.

It sounds horrible though.

Here in the frozen north it is the custom to put surnames either on the letter box of the house, or on the box at the end of the drive.

Needless to say, we do not follow the ancient tradition. I like my privacy.

And I do not care for strangers to know my name. As you know!

A of S

Marvin said...

I am not sure either what the word means, but it has a sense of threat attached to it.

I would be interested to learn more.

Jeannie ;0)

Totty Teabag said...

I have lived in Spain for 22 years, and a denuncia is a very useful tool in a country who's legal system is exceedingly slow at grinding, because the police are obliged to follow it up quickly. My dog, walking quietly on a lead, was attacked and almost skinned by two alsations let out by a Spanish neighbour as he was leaving his home. Repeated requests for a contribution to the large vet's bill were ignored, but the simple statement that I intended to make a denuncia the following morning brought him to my door that evening with the full amount of the bill. The other side of the coin is that there doesn't appear to be a time limit on when the original incident took place. Some other neighbours were involved in a traffic accident 4 years ago. They were completely exonerated by the police, and their insurance company paid all their expenses. The other driver involved has just taken out a denuncia claiming damages. They had weeks and weeks of anxiety before they found out what the denuncia was for, and then had to appear in front of the judge to defend themselves all over again.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for telling us what it meant!

A of S